Has the Class struggle been called off!?
Unions in upheaval

“Is the collective agreement finished? Unfortunately not. But for the purpose of reducing the high unemployment rate, it would be desirable to bring an end to comprehensive labor agreements. What an executive board and a secretly chosen works council can and want to agree on benefits them both. However, the applicable law to a large extent prohibits them from making company agreements and instead they are under the thumb of the common functionary ambitions of the employer’s association and the union. Both the board and the council are far from independent operators. Both fight for prestige and power – and for the preservation of their extensive official bureaucracy.“ (Helmut Schmidt, 2001)

On the first of May one can see how unions are doing. Labor Day was once their most important holiday. In a sea of red flags, trade unionists celebrated the annual High Mass of the labor movement. Calls for revolution were admittedly rather rare; however, tones of class struggle were common. Unions were force to be reckoned with. They were often drivers of policy. Today it is a rather weary event. Fewer and fewer workers have the desire to unionize themselves. Only a dedicated core still participates in the celebrations on May 1st, still waving red flags. Trade unions are now only a shadow of their former selves. Their wage and collective bargaining clout has shrunk. Collective bargaining agreements apply to increasingly fewer workers and entrepreneurs. Only in the public sector are they still strong. Their influence on politics has declined. They are increasingly dependent on the (emergency) assistance of politics. Trade unions have become a welfare case. Here in Germany Andrea Nahles, the unionist Federal Minister of Labor, energetically offers assistance. This comes at a price: free collective bargaining is becoming increasingly politicized.

“Has the Class struggle been called off!?
Unions in upheaval
weiterlesen

Der Klassenkampf ist abgesagt!?
Gewerkschaften im Umbruch

“Ist der Flächentarifvertrag am Ende? Leider nein. Aber es wäre zum Abbau der hohen Arbeitslosigkeit wünschenswert, wenn der flächendeckende Lohntarif an sein Ende gebracht würde. Was eine Geschäftsleitung und ein geheim gewählter Betriebsrat miteinander verabreden können und wollen, das nützt beiden gleichermaßen. Doch das geltende Gesetz verbietet ihnen in weitgehendem Maße betriebliche Vereinbarungen und zwingt sie stattdessen unter die gemeinsame Fuchtel der Funktionäre des Arbeitgeberverbandes und der Gewerkschaft. Beide sind vom einzelnen Betrieb weit entfernt. Beide kämpfen um Prestige und Macht – und um die Erhaltung ihrer umfangreichen hauptamtlichen Bürokratie.“(Helmut Schmidt, 2001)

Am 1. Mai sieht man, wie es Gewerkschaften geht. Der Tag der Arbeit war einst ihr höchster Feiertag. In einem Meer roter Fahnen feierten Gewerkschafter das jährliche Hochamt der Arbeiterbewegung. Aufrufe zur Revolution gab es zwar eher selten, klassenkämpferische Töne allerdings schon. Gewerkschaften waren eine Macht. Sie trieben die Politik oft vor sich her. Heute ist es eine eher müde Veranstaltung. Immer weniger Arbeitnehmer haben Lust, sich gewerkschaftlich zu organisieren. Nur noch ein harter Kern nimmt an den Feiern zum 1. Mai teil, immer noch mit roten Fahnen. Die Gewerkschaften sind nur noch ein Schatten früherer Tage. Ihre lohn- und tarifpolitische Schlagkraft ist geschrumpft. Die Tarifverträge gelten für immer weniger Arbeitnehmer und Unternehmer. Stark sind sie nur noch im öffentlichen Sektor. Ihr Einfluss auf die Politik ist gesunken. Immer öfter sind sie auf die (Not-)Hilfe der Politik angewiesen. Gewerkschaften werden zum Sozialfall. Hierzulande greift ihnen Andrea Nahles, die gewerkschaftliche Bundesarbeitsministerin, tatkräftig unter die Arme. Das hat einen Preis: Die Tarifautonomie wird immer stärker politisiert.

“Der Klassenkampf ist abgesagt!?
Gewerkschaften im Umbruch
weiterlesen