Junge Ordnungsökonomik
Small is beautiful
Kleinere Länder haben geringere Arbeitslosenquoten

„One might have hoped that, with 30 years of data, we would now have an operational theory of unemployment. I do not think that we do.“ (Olivier Blanchard)

Seit dem starken Anstieg der Arbeitslosenquoten im Europa der 1970er Jahre diskutieren Ökonomen nunmehr intensiv über die Ursachen der Arbeitslosigkeit. Zwar herrscht heute weitgehende Einigkeit darüber, dass Nachfrageeinbrüche auf den Gütermärkten, Löhne über dem Grenzprodukt der Arbeit, Insidereffekte, sowie institutionelle und politische Rahmenbedingungen zu Arbeitslosigkeit führen können. Eine einheitliche Theorie jedoch konnte bis heute nicht etabliert werden. Daran konnte auch das in den vergangenen Jahren stark ansteigende Datenmaterial nichts ändern. Offensichtlich wird die Arbeitslosenquote von einer Vielzahl verschiedener Faktoren beeinflusst. Einige dieser Faktoren sind der Theorie bekannt, einige andere hingegen konnten sich bis heute allen Forschens zum Trotz beharrlich im Dunklen verbergen. Paul Krugman äußerte im Februar 2011 auf seinem BLOG den leisen Verdacht, einer dieser Faktoren könne in der Größe der verschiedenen ökonomischen Entitäten begründet liegen. Seine Hypothese lautete schlicht: Kleinere Entitäten (Kontinente, Länder, Regionen) hätten im Vergleich zu ihren größeren Brüdern mit einem geringeren Ausmaß an Arbeitslosigkeit zu kämpfen. Von diesem Gedanken angetrieben machten wir uns daran, die „Krugman-Hypothese“ einer eingehenden empirischen Untersuchung zu unterziehen. An dieser Stelle sollen einige interessante deskriptiv-statistische Erkenntnisse vorgestellt werden. Eine ausführlichere Diskussion des Phänomens findet sich in Berthold und Gründler (2011).

Junge Ordnungsökonomik
Small is beautiful
Kleinere Länder haben geringere Arbeitslosenquoten
weiterlesen