Auf dem Weg in eine Welt ohne Renditen

“Paper money appears at first sight to be a great saving, or rather that it costs nothing; but it is the dearest money there is.“ Thomas Paine (1737 – 1809)

Was ist die Erklärung für die extrem niedrigen, immer weiter fallenden Zinsen? Vertreter von Zentralbanken verkünden, die weltweiten Ersparnisse seien zu groß geworden relativ zur Investitionsnachfrage, und das habe die Zinsen auf derart niedrige oder gar negative Niveaus befördert. Doch kann diese Erklärung überzeugen? Nein. Denn es sind ja schließlich die Zentralbanken, die die Zinsen in entscheidendem Maße kontrollieren.

“Auf dem Weg in eine Welt ohne Renditen” weiterlesen

,Money for nothing“˜?
Zu den Risiken von Nullzinspolitik und geldpolitischen Lockerungen

Am 22. Januar 2013 hat die japanische Regierung unter dem neuen Premierminister Abe mit der Bank of Japan (BOJ) eine Übereinkunft getroffen und die Notenbank künftig auf eine aggressive Geldpolitik eingeschworen. Die BOJ hat sich dabei verpflichtet, von 2014 an zeitlich unbegrenzt jeden Monat am offenen Markt private und öffentliche Anleihen anzukaufen, so lange bis die Inflationsrate die Marke von 2 % p.a. erreicht hat. Diese Zusage erfolgte auf Druck der Regierung, das Zentralbankgesetz abzuändern und die formelle Unabhängigkeit der BOJ einzuschränken. Im Gegenzug hat sich die japanische Regierung verpflichtet, überfällige Strukturreformen anzupacken, die Wettbewerbsfähigkeit Japans zu verbessern und mittelfristig einen ausgeglichenen Staatshaushalt vorzulegen.

“,Money for nothing“˜?
Zu den Risiken von Nullzinspolitik und geldpolitischen Lockerungen
weiterlesen

Ein positives geldpolitisches Exit-Szenario für Ministerpräsident Abe und andere wirtschaftspolitische Entscheidungsträger

Je länger die globale Krise schwelt und je mehr stabilitätspolitische Tabus in Form immer neuer Varianten unkonventioneller expansiver Geldpolitik gebrochen werden, desto deutlicher werden die Kehrseiten der Nullzinspolitik: Unbegrenzte kostenlose Liquidität nährt spekulative Blasen und damit neue Krisen. Steigende Zinsen gelten nicht mehr als Warnsignal zur Konsolidierung, sondern als Startsignal für neue Wellen der Liquiditätsschwemme. Durch die übermäßige Zufuhr kostenloser Liquidität werden – wie in Japan deutlich sichtbar – der Geschäftsbankensektor ebenso wie die gesamtwirtschaftliche Nachfrage schrittweise quasi verstaatlicht. Dies hat  nicht – wie jüngst vom neuen japanischen Ministerpräsidenten Abe angekündigt – zu mehr, sondern zu weniger Wachstum geführt (Schnabl 2012a).

“Ein positives geldpolitisches Exit-Szenario für Ministerpräsident Abe und andere wirtschaftspolitische Entscheidungsträger” weiterlesen