The Battle of (Great) Britain
Fear of Decline, Migration and Sovereignty

“We decide on something, leave it lying around, and wait and see what happens. If no one kicks up a fuss, because most people don’t understand what has been decided, we continue step by step until there is no turning back.” (Jean-Claude Juncker, 1999)

Now they have really done it. On the 23 June 2016 the British decided to turn their backs on the EU. They were always an important part of Europe, but they kept their distance from the EU. They arrived later and now leave earlier. As a nation of “shopkeepers“ they welcomed free trade, and had nothing against the free movement of capital. However, they had anxiety when it came to the free movement of persons. This was not always the case. After the eastward enlargement the UK did not make use of the transition period. They immediately opened the labor markets. Only in recent times has the fear of being overwhelmed by immigrants grown. The reason was the massive immigration from within and outside of the EU. The process of the “deepening“ of the EU was met with undisguised skepticism by the British since the start of their membership. They were againstny loss of national sovereignty. Membership contributions to the EU were a daily reminder that others were spending their money. To them, a political union has always been an abomination, and all the steps in this direction were suspect. And the EU, driven by the Commission, took many such steps. Britain therefore also kept its distance from the EMU, Schengen, or the Social Charter.

„The Battle of (Great) Britain
Fear of Decline, Migration and Sovereignty
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The desire for an independent country
Will it soon be Scotland everywhere?

“All peoples have the right of self-determination. By virtue of that right they freely determine their political status…“ (Human Rights Covenants of the United Nations 1966)

Scotland and Catalonia are just the tip of the iceberg. An increasing number of regions worldwide are awakening to their desire for political independence. For them, more independence from the federal government is often not enough. They aspire to become their own country. This trend of the previous decade remains intact. Since the “˜50s the number of countries has nearly doubled, increasing from 100 to almost 200. Quebec was a trailblazer in the early “˜80s whose aspirations for independence are absolutely comparable with the present development in Scotland. First in 1995 it won additional federal concessions in a referendum whose result was the razor’s edge decision that Quebec remain as part of the Canadian state. The fall of the Iron Curtain at the beginning of the “˜90s, however, led to the most significant push for the formation of new countries. With the disintegration of the Soviet Union many new countries arose in Eastern Europe. Spectacular, however, was the case of Czechoslovakia in 1993. The two countries split very suddenly. The shared currency was no obstacle to the separation and the prognosticated political and economic drama failed to appear. Many fear and others hope that a new wave of regional country-forming will begin. Regions seeking political independence often want more than mere autonomy. Their goal is the formation of their own country.

„The desire for an independent country
Will it soon be Scotland everywhere?
weiterlesen